Video Details

Sci-Tech Now

Website: http://scitechnow.org/
Next Airing: Sat, Feb 29th, 2020 at 5:00 PM on UEN-TV

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SciTech Now captures the latest breakthroughs in science, technology and innovation. With anchor Hari Sreenivasan, we check out the hottest gadgets, meet the innovators creating the startups of tomorrow and map out the mysteries of the scientific world.

Episodes:

  • Cryptocurrencies

    We take a look at what’s ahead for blockchain and cryptocurrencies. We discover what PFAs are, an acronym that stands for a family of chemicals, and why these chemicals are being detected in an increasing number of water systems. We take a look at bacteria art. And FrogWatch USA is helping citizen scientists understand the significance of frogs as an indicator species.

    Next Airing: Sat, Feb 29th, 2020 at 5:00 PM on UEN-TV
    Length: 00:26:41
    Usage rights: Expires 9/18/2023
  • Ev Techs

    We visit one of the first graduating classes of Tesla car technicians who are headed off to the workplace after an intense training course. We take a look at a new object management system that utilizes radio waves. In North Carolina, a regional acoustic bats survey is underway to identify bats, where they’re going, and how they’re doing in urban and rural environments. And we visit incubators spaces across New Jersey continuing to foster New Jersey’s spirit of invention, while also inspiring the next generation of inventors.

    Next Airing: Mon, Mar 2nd, 2020 at 8:00 PM on UEN-TV
    Length: 00:26:40
    Usage rights: Expires 9/18/2021
  • Printing Homes

    Freelance journalist and author, Todd Zwillich, discusses John Houbolt, one of the least known figures on the Apollo 11 team, and how his discoveries propelled NASA to the moon. We take an in-depth look at spider silk and the webs they weave. Scientists developed a wristband that measures cells. And a tech startup in Texas hopes to end homelessness by 3D printing homes.

    Next Airing: Mon, Mar 9th, 2020 at 8:00 PM on UEN-TV
    Length: 00:26:40
    Usage rights: Expires 9/18/2023
  • Language Connections

    In this episode of SciTech Now, Professor Erich Jarvis discusses spoken language and what we can learn about it from songbirds. We take a look at 3D mapping technology of the human eye. We join citizen scientists coming together to clean up Hawaii’s beaches. And high schoolers prepare for a spoken word performance on climate change.

    Next Airing: Mon, Mar 16th, 2020 at 8:00 PM on UEN-TV
    Length: 00:26:40
    Usage rights: Expires 9/18/2023
  • High-Tech Careers

    We take a look at how scientists found a giant reservoir of water beneath the ocean floor. In Utah, Weber State University and Davis Tech are helping students gain experience working with advanced composites. A research team is working to replace the current method of skin cancer detection with a less invasive option. And the Local Environmental Observer Network in Alaska helps citizens share their knowledge, observations, and concerns about the environment.

    Next Airing: Mon, Mar 23rd, 2020 at 8:00 PM on UEN-TV
    Length: 00:26:41
    Usage rights: Expires 9/18/2023
  • Amazing Tardigrades

    For parents in the U.S. who don’t speak English, their kids often become translators or so-called language brokers. A researcher in Texas is working to understand the effects that language brokering can have on child development. Science reporter, Dave Mosher, discusses robotic lunar exploration. Tardigrades are the most resilient creatures on the Earth; now researchers have identified the genes and proteins that make this resilience possible and hope they can be used to make life saving medicines. And we get a behind the scenes look at a national tech competition.

    Length: 00:26:40
    Usage rights: Expires 9/18/2021
  • Flu Factory

    We take a look at the work being done by the Girl Scouts and Raytheon to encourage young women to become future leaders in the STEM workforce. We hear from artist Naho Matsuda, who’s art installation “Every Thing Every Time,” transforms static data into tactile and thought-provoking art. We visit the world’s largest cell culture-based flu vaccine factory in North Carolina. And we see how students at Rice University are improving their engineering skills through a program that allows them to make their ideas a reality.

    Length: 00:26:40
    Usage rights: Expires 9/18/2021
  • Preserving & Prevention

    Discover how modern virtual reality technology is preserving the past. Students in New York are among the first in the country to study police body camera footage in the classroom. A research lab at the University of Texas has the potential to revolutionize the pharmaceutical industry. And a biometrics lab is looking into why ACL knee injuries are so high among teen girl athletes and how to help these athletes prevent injuries.

    Length: 00:26:40
    Usage rights: Expires 9/18/2021
  • Prosthetic Fine Art

    We take a look at the air transportation workforce of tomorrow and the challenges it faces. We learn what it takes to master the job of a prosthetic specialist. And we look at how scientists are using robots to speed up the process of developing new pharmaceutical drugs.

    Length: 00:26:40
    Usage rights: Expires 9/18/2021
  • Screen Time

    Ainissa Ramirez, scientists and host of the podcast Science Underground, sits down with Hari to discuss how close we are to eating lab grown meat. We continue the exploration of the impact of technology in schools as we look at the growing concern over screen time. And we look at how developers and engineers in Los Angeles are making skyscrapers and towers earthquake safe using the latest technology.

    Length: 00:26:40
    Usage rights: Expires 9/18/2023
  • Tech Bias

    Ever wondered why Siri, Alexa, and other personal assistant devices speak with female voices? Sarach Myers West, a postdoctoral researcher at the AI Now Institute shares how there may be a built-in bias in artificial intelligent technology. We follow a community advocate who is working to help residents in Detroit get their water turned back on. We take a look at the national Race to 2026 program that is helping students get into the automotive industry. And we see how students in upstate New York are helping hikers and citizens better understand the seasons.

    Length: 00:26:41
    Usage rights: Expires 9/18/2023
  • Understanding Gravity

    We look at what we know and don’t know about gravity with The Trouble with Gravity: Solving the Mystery Beneath Our Feet author, Richard Panek. Cornell University is tackling the question of how to best develop crops that can grow and survive year-round. We discover the unique properties of squid eyes. And we see how students are learning the skills they need to succeed in today’s workforce with hands on technical experiences.

    Length: 00:26:40
    Usage rights: Expires 9/18/2023

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