Video Details

Future Food

Website: http://www.bullfrogfilms.com/catalog/ffs.html

Availability information for this program

Tonight there will be 219,000 new mouths to feed at the world's dinner table -- that's 80 million more people over the next year. In the year 2050, there will be 9 billion people on planet Earth. How do we feed them fairly, safely and well, and make sure that every mouth is fed? FUTURE FOOD is a highly topical new documentary series that asks how we are going to feed ourselves in the 21st Century, and looks for answers in Peru, Kenya, USA, India, Nigeria and China. From the producers of the popular LIFE series on globalization and its effects on communities and people around the world.

Episodes:

  • Fat Or Skinny?

    Everyday, as India awakes, 1.2 billion people need to be fed. By 2050 it could be 1.7 billion. Half a billion small scale farmers supply most of India's food. Traditionally, Indians have eaten the healthy cuisine of India's 29 states, but as people move to the cities there's a growing demand for fast processed food, the so-called 'junk food' accused of causing obesity and chronic health problems. Now India is a country on the edge of two possible futures: a future that's well fed and healthy; or a future with Western diets and Western obesity. With so many hungry people to feed, is it possible to eat in ways that are nutritionally and environmentally sustainable? What role do governments have to play in creating economic incentives for sustainable diets?

    Length: 00:28:00
    Usage rights: Expires 6/30/2020
  • Near Or Far?

    The proponents of globalization suggest we buy our food from the cheapest sources, no matter where in the world that might be. Now that food prices are rising again, countries rich and poor have begun to reconsider the price of imported food and many governments, from Brazil to Micronesia, are setting quotas in support of local food production. Nigeria, the world's seventh most populous country, is one of the world's largest food importers. The charismatic Akinwunmi Ayo Adesina, Nigerian Minister for Agriculture, believes it is his job to ensure Nigerians eat food grown in Nigeria. Experts say the Minister's plans could be a model for other African nations. But do people really want to eat only food grown at home? What impact do food policies have on the local economy and local diets? And in a globalized world, is self-sufficiency really the answer?

    Length: 00:28:00
    Usage rights: Expires 6/30/2020
  • Stay Or Go?

    In many remote areas of China young people have little choice but to stay on the land, and yet they may face a destitute future, with millions of farmworkers in China earning less than two dollars a day. Although there are some exceptions, farming is not generally seen as a "sexy" career choice. The reality is that in China and around the world, young people are fleeing the countryside and moving to the big cities. Who will grow the food that feeds future generations? How can young people be convinced that farming is a good option? Californian-born Rand and his wife Sherry are the founders of Resonance China, a social media agency in Shanghai. They use the internet to create and identify trends and tricks that can create a buzz for global brands. FUTURE FOOD sets Resonance a task: can they make farming popular with young people?

    Length: 00:27:59
    Usage rights: Expires 6/30/2020

Availability: