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Research Roundup

Core Subject(s): Science
Website: http://www.uen.org/emedia
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Episodes:

  • Research Roundup. Aspen Contribution/ Nerve and Blood Vessel Growth.

    Could the decline of aspen contribute to a reduction in water flowing down from the mountains into valley watersheds? Dr. Ron Ryel, Utah State University / researchers at the University of Utah received a grant to research a protein that promotes nerve and blood vessel growth. This could potentially prevent or reverse complications of diabetes such as poor circulation, loss of limbs, blindness and cardiovascular disease. The professor, found that aspen zones have higher snowpacks and increased soil moisture.

    Length: 00:00:00
  • Research Roundup. Bryce Canyon/ Local Trails.

    Length: 00:00:52
  • Research Roundup. Bryce Canyon/ Trails and Health.

    Length: 00:00:51
  • Research Roundup. Defribruillator/ Genetic Mutation and Blindness.

    Researchers at the University of Utah have created a prototype defibrillator device that comes with a video screen and speakers. Even those without medical training can perform CPR and assess the needs of the victim. / Utah scientists have discovered a genetic mutation that increases a person's risk of macular degeneration, which causes blindness in the elderly. The discovery, led by Dr. Kang Zhang, will allow scientists to explore treatments and preventive strategies for patients.

    Length: 00:00:00
  • Research Roundup. Earthquake Engineering/ Fighting Cells.

    Length: 00:00:00
  • Research Roundup. Earthquakes Linked to Weather/Bryce Canyon Fossils.

    Are earthquakes linked to weather? Utah State University geologist Anthony Lowry discovered that fault movement occurs at almost exactly the same time each year. A connection between atmospheric changes and faults provides a valuable tool for understanding earthquakes. / Jeff Eaton, geosciences professor at Weber State University, spent the summer searching for fossils. His team is surveying Bryce Canyon's paleontological resources. Tiny teeth, limb bones and vertebrae dating back to between 65 million and 135 million years have been uncovered.

    Length: 00:00:57
  • Research Roundup. Emotional Closeness/Canyoneering the Colorado Plateau.

    The degree of emotional closeness allows the biology of one person to influence that of the other. Dr. Lisa Diamond and Dr. Lisa Aspinwall, psychologists at the University of Utah, describe this as merging two discrete physiologies into a connected circuit. / Dr. Jon Smith, professor of Communication at Southern Utah University, explores canyon geology, as well as the history and growth of the canyoneering sport in the documentary ?Canyoneering the Colorado Plateau.?

    Length: 00:00:51
  • Research Roundup. Family Relations/ CTBP.

    Four Weber State University students were awarded the 2006 Outstanding Undergraduate Research Paper by the National Council on Family Relations. The student researchers found that individuals who experience more break-ups actually hold healthier beliefs about relationships than those who had experienced fewer break-ups. / Researchers at University of Utah's Huntsman Cancer Institute have discovered a new possibility for treating colon cancer. By genetically disabling the C-Terminal Binding Protein (CTBP), researchers rescued zebrafish from the effects of a mutation that leads to colon polyps.

    Length: 00:01:02
  • Research Roundup. Memory and the Future/ USU's Isotope Journal.

    Jason M. Watson, assistant professor of psychology at the University of Utah, and colleagues report that memory and future thought are interrelated. Advanced brain imaging techniques show that with each process similar patterns of activity within precisely the same broad network of brain regions are stimulated. / The National Endowment for the Arts announced that ?Isotope: A Journal of Literary Nature & Science Writing,? produced by Utah State University's Department of English, has won a prestigious literary publishing grant for fiscal year 2007.

    Length: 00:00:59
  • Research Roundup. Mexico Service Project/ Alzheimer's.

    Dr. Sarah Bush is having freshmen engineering students design a resource efficient, environmentally sustainable house out of steel shipping containers. The students will then build the house they design over spring break in Mexico as a service project to help a family in need. / Utah State University researchers JoAnn Tschanz and Maria Norton are examining what might slow the effects and ultimately prevent Alzheimer's. From their research, they conclude that exercise, the right diet and other factors could delay the onset of dementia or cognitive decline.

    Length: 00:00:56
  • Research Roundup. Motions Sickness/Aspen Tree Genetics.

    Why do passengers get car sick, but drivers don?t? Dr. Paul Gahlinger, a professor at the University of Utah who did research on motion sickness for NASA, states ?passengers aren't watching the road as closely as drivers.? This means their eyes are not in sync with their inner ears. The brain gets confused by the discrepancy in motion signals, causing sickness. / An aspen tree often reproduces by sending up new root sprouts, called ?suckers? which were thought to be exact clones. New research by Utah State University geneticist, Karen Mock, and colleagues suggests that similar patterns amongst aspens are not perfect predictors of genetic identity.

    Length: 00:00:53
  • Research Roundup. Mule Cloning/ Parsing Newspaper Text.

    Two mule clones, products of a USU and University of Idaho research project, provide opportunities for cancer research. The research team observed that stallions do not develop prostate cancer and their metabolism is slower than humans. The difference in cellular activity may play a role in both cancer development and reproduction. / Are newspapers around the world reporting fact or fiction? A research project entitled ?Sorting Facts and Opinions for Homeland Security? is being conducted by University of Utah professor, Ellen Riloff, and two other colleagues. Machine-learning algorithms will teach computers to parse through phrases and distinguish between fact and opinion.

    Length: 00:00:54
  • Research Roundup. Rio Grande River/ Healthcare Detection Grant.

    The EPA?s Office of Cooperative Environmental Management invited Utah State University hydrologist Jack Schmidt to evaluate the Rio Grande River. Although it once was a wide, sandy river, it now resembles an irrigation ditch and is choked with invasive vegetation. / The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention awarded a $3.7 million grant designed to enhance healthcare detection and response to emerging public health threats. The University of Utah is one of three centers of public health informatics that was funded.

    Length: 00:00:56
  • Research Roundup. San Jacinto Fault/ New Catheter Techniques.

    According to researchers at Utah State University, The San Jacinto fault is younger than previously thought. Dr. Susanne U. Janecke and colleagues determined that the fault?s slip began about 1 million years ago, making it an important player in southern California?s seismically active fault zones. / A new catheter technique pioneered at the University of Utah Orthopaedic Center is decreasing post operative pain. Dr. Jeff Swenson and his research team use ultrasound to place a catheter near affected nerves, enabling the delivery of pain medication pre- and post-op.

    Length: 00:00:57
  • Research Roundup. Sea Sponges/ Innovation and Economic Development.

    The bacteria that live within sea sponges may be key to producing drugs that fight cancer and other diseases. Dr. Eric W. Schmidt, University of Utah medicinal chemist is researching genetic changes that occur within these small organisms to potentially develop new compounds. / Curt Roberts, a vice president for Nike and an alumnus of Weber State University, has been selected to serve as vice provost for Innovation & Economic Development at the university. USTAR intends to accelerate Utah research and development, enabling licensing of new products and services more quickly.

    Length: 00:00:56
  • Research Roundup. Snail Venom/ Quantum Computers.

    University of Utah scientists have discovered a new approach to treating severe nerve pain. The researchers found that the toxins from cone snail venom treated nerve pain by blocking a specific type of molecule receptors. / Scientists are a step closer to designing super fast quantum computers. Using the principals of quantum mechanics, University of Utah physicist Christoph Boehme demonstrated it's possible to read data stored in the form of the magnetic "spins" of phosphorus atoms.

    Length: 00:00:56
  • Research Roundup. Space Research/ Atacama Desert.

    Utah State University is number one in the nation for space research funding, taking the lead over institutions such as Johns Hopkins University and Massachusetts Institute of Technology. / Utah State University professor Linda Powers is working with NASA's Spaceward Bound program. In June 2006, Powers went to South America?s Atacama Desert, one of the driest places on Earth. Studying these extreme environments may provide clues to what could live on Mars.

    Length: 00:00:51
  • Research Roundup. Yellowstone/ Prostate Cancer.

    Jeff Eaton, geosciences professor at Weber State University, spent the summer searching for fossils. His team is surveying Bryce Canyon?s paleontological resources. Tiny teeth, limb bones and vertebrae dating back to between 65 million and 135 million years have been uncovered. / Two mule clones, products of a USU and University of Idaho research project, provide opportunities for cancer research. The research team observed that stallions do not develop prostate cancer and their metabolism is slower than humans. The difference in cellular activity may play a role in both cancer development and reproduction.

    Length: 00:00:57

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